Darwin vs. KFC.

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12 Responses to Darwin vs. KFC.

  1. Steve says:

    Very true & funny.

  2. iHunger says:

    I’ve often joked that the best way to save endangered species is to start raising them for food.

  3. nsk says:

    Absolutely brilliant. What a way to die … to be nurtured only to be killed!!

  4. fireflight says:

    Save the earth! Eat the spotted owl!

  5. qka says:

    @iHunger

    The converse is true too.

    Many “weeds” are edible. As a youngster, I tried to get my parents to see the wisdom of this, figuring that if we ate the weeds from the garden, they would die off of their own accord.

    Anything to try to get out of weeding the garden.

  6. Tater says:

    Unfortunately, as the population goes up, the quality of life goes down for those numerous chickens. Nobody looks at those factory-farm chickens and says, “Man, that’s what I call living!”

  7. eric says:

    Unfortunately, as the population goes up, the quality of life goes down for those numerous chickens. Nobody looks at those factory-farm chickens and says, “Man, that’s what I call living!”
    I guess you don’t live around Manhattan, then?

  8. Shay says:

    So true!

    My parents often relate that when they were growing up a roast chicken was an infrequent delicacy, whereas nowadays they’re commodity fast food.

  9. Garrett Mclean says:

    couldn’t be more true

    Garrett McLean at sm compufix

  10. Neal Werle says:

    Technically, the chicken part should be a dot, not a line. The population of the chicken species does not grow with predators, except over large periods of time. Since chickens are one species, they are a stationary dot in the upper left corner.

    I think it would maybe be funny, too.

  11. a1s says:

    Technically, the chicken part should be a dot, not a line.
    The ideas is that as the human population grows (which is to some degree a coincidence) so does the popularity of mass produced chickens. it’s a line.

    interestingly enough, line A is in reality a kind of bell curve- a species with no predators will grow very large, but a near-extinct species will often have a singe predator (alright, alright “… and Mankind”).

  12. Pingback: Darwin vs. KFC (via Indexed) | i love myles [beta]

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